Author Archives: markephillips

About markephillips

This is about me.

Microsoft’s HoloLens is now available to rent — TechCrunch

Microsoft has spent much of the past couple years arguing its vision of an augmented reality future with the HoloLens. Now, it’s realizing that for potential buyers of the company’s enterprise-focused Commercial Suite edition, there’s some desire to try it out before they break out the corporate card. Until now, the best way for interested…

via Microsoft’s HoloLens is now available to rent — TechCrunch

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Can’t Wait to Play With This

Today is HomePod launch day in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia, and as promised, the speaker is now on display and available to purchase at most of Apple’s retail stores in each of those countries. HomePod box via Kris Jones on Twitter HomePod has already received rave reviews for its sound quality from…

via HomePod is Now Widely Available at Apple Stores — MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors – All Stories

Make Bigger!

Researchers at Newcastle University, U.K. believe they’ve discovered a differently evolved form of stereo vision in mantises. The research team studied the phenomenon in the insects precisely as one would hope — by attaching a pair of tiny 3D glasses to their bug eyes. Read More

via Researchers discovered a new kind of stereo vision by putting tiny 3D glasses on mantises — TechCrunch

Do we need a cup that tells us what we are drinking?

I’m excited about this.

The Internet of Things

This week, we’ll look into the Vessyl and if it’s taking the “Internet of Things” too far.

Have you heard of this new product? It is a cup that tells you what liquid is in it. Watch the video below for a (way too long) explanation.

The video boasts the cup’s ability to track the user’s hydration, as well as calorie, fat, and sugar intake. Of course it connects wirelessly to an app on your phone (like every “Internet of Things” product) and an online tracking system of what you consume. Many, including me, have questions about this, the most obvious one being: why do we need this? I would argue this is taking the “Internet of Things” idea to an unnecessary and ridiculous place.

The product becomes more ridiculous when you learn the process of its production. It has been over 7 years in the making, which begs…

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